Returning Stars and Rising Rookies In These Korean Dramas to Spoil Us This 2018

I experienced some sort of Korean drama hiatus for a couple of months. I thought that the drama titles produced in the last quarter of 2017 were forced, poorly produced, and seemingly the writers haven’t had enough time to thoroughly conceptualize a solid story line.

Although I noticed the lack of presence of popular Kdrama Oppa[s] (most of them are currently rending their mandatory military service) this year, the hope I saw in a few rising stars, who took the limelight and continued to bring in good stuff for Kdrama fans to enjoy, brought satisfaction *still* in some way.

Since this hope made me so excited to what it seems to be a pocketful of sunshine (in this particular drama realm, if I may say) I decided to briefly list down a few new Korean drama titles, highlighted by returning celebrities and promising rookies in brief summation.
IU and Lee Sun-Kyun in “My Ajeossi”

Untitled design (1).png

Just about to sprinkle more goodness this year, singer and actress IU is back as the lead in upcoming TvN drama “My Ajeossi” together with Lee Sun-kyun, who will be playing the (and for the second time, after playing one in The Coffee Prince) Ajeossi role. The story is about a May-December relationship that will help both characters to heal and surpass old wounds. The drama is slated to air in the first half of 2018. Nara of K-pop group Hello Venus will also join the cast.

When Jang Dong-gun “Suits” the remake

doc6iwre79iqvkba78l5rp-1024x1024.jpg

This iconic Oppa is back with a remake of the popular US drama series, “Suits”! Actor Jang Dong-gun will be playing the role of Harvey Spector, a successful but quite an unorthodox lawyer. Park Hyung-sik will also join Jang Dong-gun in the remake. The Korean version of the series will show current courtroom drama trend and will air in the first half of 2018 on KBS2.

Seo Kang-Joon in “Are You Human, Too?”

seo-kang-joon2.jpg

The drama realm is never falling short of common sci-fi/robot storylines but this drama stood out for me—and of course the eye-candy Seo Kang-Joon is in it.

Seo Kang-Joon will be a robot processed with artificial intelligence that will be a stand-in for the comatose son of a rich family and then falls in love (now that is uncanningly interesting!) with a human being. The actor will play both the role of the robot and the son. This pre-produced sci-fi drama will air on KBS2.

Lee Byung-hun and Kim Tae-ri Travel Back in Time in “Mister Sunshine”


The rising actress Kim Tae-ri will highlight the upcoming TvN drama “Mister Sunshine” with actor Lee Byung-hun, to be aired in summer. Byung-hun will portray a character that went to America in the 1870s and surprisingly travels back in time to Joseon Era as a US soldier. The drama is the brainchild of Writer Kim Eun-sook and will be directed by Director Lee Eung-bok, who both had redefined success by giving us moving melodramas such as “Descendants of the Sun” and “The Goblin”.
Red Velvet’s Joy and Woo Do-han in “Great Temptation”


MBC’s new drama “Great Temptation” cast Red Velvet’s Joy and Woo Do-han as leads and scheduled to air in the first half of the year. In this drama, Woo will do everything to make Joy believe in love. The drama is based on the French novel, “Dangerous Liaisons”.
Bae Doo-na in Netflix Original drama “Kingdom”

2925024d-1314-4ce1-a014-c19c4a106667.jpg

International star Bae Doo-na will star in Netflix Original series “Kingdom” and will be released in the latter half of the year through the global streaming app. The first Netflix Original Korean drama is an eight-episode series about a unique story of Joseon Era zombies. Quite interesting, eh?

Product Review: iWhite Korea Nose Pack

I started using iWhite Korea Nose Pack during my college days. I was quite excited about it, especially when I found out that there’s solution to my comedone problem.

At first I was hesitant to use nose strips during that time as I was young and afraid that the more the dirt pulled out, the worst they occur the next time. However, my skin eventually became visually unpleasant (maybe due to the pollution—Manila, hello.) and I got into that point that I couldn’t stand the sight of my nose anymore.  So then I decided to use iWhite Korea Nose Pack since it’s affordable and available at South Star Drugstore near our village.

images (1).jpg
Well, I have to say, after my first ever use, I finally figured out why my sister went all crazy about this Nose Pack.

***

iWhite Korea Nose Pack is really affordable compared to other nose strips available in Watsons, specifically. I do believe that this product is way cooler than other peel-off types in the market, including strip off versions as well, due to the following reasons:

1. Formulation. It automatically gives you that refreshing and cooling effect, upon application. This might sound unnecessary, but applying nose pack every single time makes me feel refreshed and relaxed. Plus, I do like the color–it just simply makes me trust the product all the more, aesthetically speaking. There are other peel off nose packs that come in darker hues and they all look unpleasant to me.

20160725_134411.jpg

2. Smell. I like the smell. Sure, it does give a hint of glue scent, but I don’t mind.

3. Price. Yes! It is affordable. A sachet costs Php18, which is good for 2-3 uses. Its 50ml tube is available at Php 199. For students, hear me out—this is going to be your must-have, believe me. I understand the trouble of getting blackheads time and again.

4. Effectiveness. Well, I just get so giddy whenever I see the dirt all pulled out. Who wouldn’t?

20160725_144905.jpg
My nose is practically clean so you would’t see any blackheads/whiteheads in this photo. Make sure you apply the whole thing very thickly so that it’s easier to peel off and to avoid holes like the ones in this photo. 

5. Ingredients. It is infused with:

  • Mulberry Root Extract that actually lightens the face—no wonder why I get clearer and lighter skin after use. Also, I noticed that my skin became a bit radiantly pinkish.
  • Panax Ginseng Root Extract that rejuvenates skin cells and improves skin elasticity.

Well, I can go on forever enumerating nice things about this product, but there’s one thing that I don’t quite like: its messy application.

Recommendation: Yes, I highly recommend this product, especially to those who are experiencing stubborn comedone problems for quite too long already.

I am glad that we have such a nice Nose Pack from a Korean company here in the Philippines. I got to say, this one is for the books!

Of Dramas, Novels, and Culture: My Never-ending Journey to Asian Culture

Okay. I am starting this blog with a joyous heart and emotional drive.

Before writing this, I tweeted my intention of creating a feature that eventually allowed me to realize how dramas moved me in so many ways. I have to admit that life isn’t always “ice cream with a cherry on top”, and sometimes I also feel that need to get out of the reality and unexpectedly, watching Asian dramas became one of my go-to fortresses.

 

Aside from watching Asian dramas (movies, including), I also read various Asian novels (the English translations of most novels I read were so hard to find back then!), manga, manhwa or webtoons especially if my time– or mobile data, for that matter!– permits. I cannot recall the time I started reading these kinds of contemporary Asian literatures, but reckon it started in 1997 where I discovered a book about Asian literature at the back of our house. It contained poems, narratives, and speeches of renowned Asian figures in the arts and literature.

Perhaps, the idea of myself as an Asian, who gradually developed a deep interest in Asian history and culture, pushed me to learn more and go beyond of what I am. Of what I already know.

So, my journey to discovering Asian culture did not stop at watching Asian films/dramas or reading Asian literature. I was about to take my MA in Asian Studies at a prestige university here in the Philippines, but upon weighing my options and thinking thoroughly about my life in general (long term goals, including), I opted to take MBA instead and put my “MA in Asian Studies dream” at rest for the time being (I actually had my credentials already forwarded for the MA exam in this university and at the same time passed the MBA qualifying exam at another state university).

Don’t get me wrong, I love my current program. It’s just that I love this part of me who loves all things ASIAN, more than the other part of me who likes being so… corporate.

The “Other Side” of the Coin

I’ve been working for an East Asian owned company for years, and during those years I realized that reality sure bites hard. I discovered flaws (which can be overlooked, of course!), and heard subtle insults (due to East Asian superiority complex, I guess?) to name a few. I eventually came into my senses that my fondness over things that relates to “Asian” shouldn’t cloud my whole perception of this particular race just because I was too exposed to its “glorified” packaging, all thanks to media.

There were times that I don’t want to watch a particular drama or read any literature from a certain country. I guess there are times that we discover or experience terrible encounters and inevitably, sucking them up just to get by. But, I am not generalizing. I know that we all are just the same, and there are people of different nationality who are as kind (or better!) as our own people. 🙂

Because of my experiences, I learned how to overlook racial flaws and decided to see through the mistakes and accepted the beauty of diversity, history, and culture. Although some nationalities that I have met no longer practice any of the tradition or culture that our books taught us, I still saw a thin line that connects a certain race to another race–a commonality.

The Drive That Makes Me Who I Am Today

My fondness over “Asian” things makes my day a little bit brighter. This fondness pushed me to create online platforms, not to attract attention, but to share knowledge and information with people who have the same interest. I am not saying that I’m a pro in this particular field — NO– in fact, younger followers of Asian popular culture actually know a lot more than I do. 🙂

We all feel the need to connect with people who share the same interest and opinion on a certain topic. Connecting with one another allows us to have a deeper understanding of who we are as Asians, sans the difference in culture, tradition, language, and lifestyle. While this can be regarded as one of the many ways to truly immerse, I think this journey of discovering who we are in this race called “Asian” will surely never end. 🙂

LOGO (1)